Thank You! Analog will Notify you on Nov. 17.@analog.poems

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Thank you.  Analog will contact you personally when vērtigo is available. 
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Foreword
Vertigo's Foreword
by Analog de Leon
“When love awakens in your life, in the night of your heart, it is like the dawn breaking within you.” —JOHN O’DONOHUE

John O’Donohue thought a flickering candle in a dark room to be the most beautiful scene the universe could possess. This image never left me. When I first imagined the mysterious candle, I saw her. My Anam Cara. She is an idea that could launch a thousand ships.

Later I learned that a candle was the key that let us map our universe.

A professor at a university once asked several of his students to row out in boats onto a pond. He gave each of them a candle and positioned their boats near to far every few feet. That night they learned that light has a brightness and a color that determines how close or far away it is from the source. Scientists used this new idea to calculate the size of our universe and to determine exactly where each star is in the cosmic sea, and it taught me a deep mystery about myself and my relationship with the universe.

Today, the unit for the brightness or dimness of a star is a candle. It measures a star’s luminosity. This new science taught us that a star moving away from the Earth appears red and when moving toward us, a star cools to blue.

She must be one million red candles.

It is remarkable how a lesson hidden in a simple candle can catalyze a massive change in our perspective and relationship to the universe. We are no longer lost. We have a location in the vastness.

These days when I imagine a candle dancing on a cave wall, I see a deep mystery. A foreign belly dancer unfolding on the rocks, serving my fascination with full awareness. I can’t look away. I see God in the flickering light.

Powerful ideas and symbols live and evolve in us like the taste of wine. The more complex an idea, the more layers of the onion. Like hieroglyphics, great symbols require interpretation and deep inspection through a blue filter to unearth their light. We have to seek truth. It never leaves us, but it waits for us to stop running and draw closer to it.

Vertigo is presented here in three parts, though it is really just one work in three. At its root, Vertigo attempts to convey a sense of wholeness. It has been broken up into individual stanzas that can be read consecutively, but Vertigo is really just one epic style poem.

The illustrations tell the story of a turbulent journey from separation to oneness, that has taken me more than a decade to distill, and it also chronicles two weeks of my life one February when the dawn broke within me. It’s interesting how the phases of the moon leave a fingerprint in time, a unique record for each day in the sky.

Vertigo was inspired by O’Donohue’s curious candle and St. Simeon Stylites, a Syrian who lived for several years on a small platform atop a pillar—the final stand against a great tide of darkness. It is a story that has been stirring in me for more than a decade. A map for a lost generation of anxious people holding on for life as the train of progress careens violently forward into midnight.

This brave new age is trying desperately to convince us that we are digital, that our humanity is not of the earth but of the air, of the Wi-Fi and the radio waves, of the 4Gs and the AIs. If you take anything from this book, I hope it is a deeper presence with yourself and the people in your life. When I learned to unplug and be present, I was taught a great secret. My greatest hope is that Vertigo encourages you to seek out the white space in your days, those moments of clarity with the wind that restore your soul and guide your steps.

Vertigo is about the relationship between love and light, loss and darkness, our humanity and the infinite. These relationships don’t seem definable as an intellectual process, as if the fabric that connects them is encrypted and can’t be accessed or understood without examining it with some higher human function.

Vertigo is a book about letting go.

“Each mind fabricates itself. We sense its limits for we have made them.” —RILKE
Analog's Initiatives
Lost Poets, Crown Anthologies, Words with Queens & Kings, Global Action Platform, TEDxNashville, TEDxVeniceBeach, World in 2050, Global Talent Summit,
ANALOG'S INITIATIVES
Lost Poets, Crown Anthologies,
Global Action Platform, Global Talent Summit, World
“Reach. Never stop reaching.  
When you think
there is nothing left to grab,
there is always more.  
The universe is infinite
and still unfolding,
and even as you see creation undone,
it is all the while
birthing something new,
something further,
something reachable.”

-- Analog (My First Poem)
About The Author 
Chris Purifoy (aka Analog de Leon) is a writer with more than 200k followers online, a technology architect, and one of the pioneers of a global subculture of modern poetry. He speaks in global forums about the slippery slope of progress and the importance of art with purpose.

Chris is the Co-Founder of Lost Poets, an organization dedicated to this resistance, with leadership ranging from entertainment powerhouses such as Gregg Latterman, Founder of Aware Records (i.e. John Mayer), and global policy leaders such as Ana C. Rold, the Editor-at-Large of the G7 (formerly the G8) and the G20. 

Read Full Bio
Analog's Initiatives
Lost Poets, Crown Anthologies, Words with Queens & Kings, Global Action Platform, TEDxNashville, TEDxVeniceBeach, World in 2050, Global Talent Summit,
ANALOG'S INITIATIVES
Lost Poets, Crown Anthologies,
Global Action Platform, Global Talent Summit, World
“Reach. Never stop reaching.  
When you think
there is nothing left to grab,
there is always more.  
The universe is infinite
and still unfolding,
and even as you see creation undone,
it is all the while
birthing something new,
something further,
something reachable.”

-- Analog (My First Poem)